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5 Training Movements Every Hunter Should Be Doing- by Kenton Clairmont

By | 2018-03-30T18:35:28+00:00 March 30th, 2018|blog|

In the past ten years hunters have become more and more aware of the benefits of training for the physical demands of hunting. These demands vary from one hunt to the next, but the common thread is that we all can benefit from being fit for the adventure. With that said, there is so much

“The Importance of Posterior Chain Training For Backcountry Performance.”-Tyler Hoelzen, TTH Personal Coach

By | 2018-03-22T21:18:53+00:00 March 22nd, 2018|blog|

By: Ty Hoelzen, CPT When I ask the majority of the general public about what they do for posterior chain training, I get the “deer in the headlights” response. The immediate question that then follows their response is, “What the heck is the posterior chain?!” Well, lets start there. The posterior chain is a group

ALTITUDE SICKNESS – Wilderness Medicine Article Review By Ryan Clairmont

By | 2017-07-24T15:12:35+00:00 June 29th, 2017|blog|

RelevanceEvery year 30 million people find themselves in Resort towns 6500-9800 feet. Tens of Thousands of climbers, trekkers, and skiers worldwide ascend to elevations from 9800ft to 18,000ft, often at a rate that exceeds an individual’s ability to acclimatize. As hunters we fit somewhere amongst these statistics and unless we understand the physiology of what

Foods to Fuel your Train to Hunt Challenges

By | 2017-07-24T14:53:37+00:00 May 18th, 2017|blog|

What you eat before and after a Train to Hunt challenge can have a huge impact on your performance. Most of us participating in Train to Hunt are putting a lot of effort into our health. We’re tweaking our nutrition and pushing our workouts. However, it’s easy to show up to an event and let

Minimizing Soreness from Exercise – Ray Hibnes

By | 2017-07-24T15:25:27+00:00 July 21st, 2016|blog|

Everyone gets sore from training. I get the question all the time from our new CrossFit members. They’ve just completed their foundation classes and seem to be moving a little slow: “If I keep working out regularly will I stop being sore?” My answer is always “No.” At this point in the conversation with the